Mixed Reaction Over Trump’s Announcement To Recognize Jerusalem As Israel’s Capital

Jacob Bender, the executive director of the Council on American Islamic Relations, believes Trump’s formal acknowledgement of Jerusalem as the capital may stall the ongoing peace process and bring more volatility to the region.

“The final status of Jerusalem should be negotiated. You don’t make unilateral moves on such an important, crucial issue,” said Bender, a Jewish American who lived in Jerusalem for seven years.

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TRUMPadelphia: Trump’s tweets, the tax bill, and more

“The closest we’ve seen in contemporary history to anything like this was George Wallace, who ran for president in 1968 and famously used this kind of rhetoric,” Zelizer said. “But he was a third party candidate. And he didn’t win.” Trump’s public rhetoric on race, religion and immigration, he said, is almost better suited to presidents of the 19th and early 20th centuries — and amplified through social media. “These [tweets] fall squarely within that historical record of shame,” said Jacob Bender, the director of the Philly chapter of the Council of American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).

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Ahmet Selim Tekelioglu and Dr. Shakeel Amanullah

How to be a faithful Muslim: Islamic speaker says it comes down to a matter of choice

In a sermon titled “How to be religious today,” Muslim speaker Ahmet Selim Tekelioglu asked the 100-plus members at the Islamic Community Center of Lancaster how they could leave last Friday’s call to prayer as confident Muslims who are “proud in our skins and proud in our identity and aware of our obligations to Allah.” It is, he said, a matter of choice, but a choice fraught with challenges.

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Critics Weigh In On Trump’s New Travel Ban

The Philadelphia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, says the new travel ban is unconstitutional, just like the last one. “This is just another attempt to unlawfully restrict the immigration of people who practice Islam, and people who hail from different parts of the globe that the president has demonstrated some form of xenophobia towards,” said CAIR’s Timothy Welbeck.

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In U.S., are Muslims the new Jews?

Other immigrants, such as those from Germany, Italy, and Asia, often got the cold shoulder, too, but it was not as severe. The U.S. always has been a little bipolar on immigration — elated at the idea of a Land of Immigrants, but some of us not so keen when the new arrivals don’t look like us.

Muslims are the latest to arrive in numbers, and they carry the additional burden of being associated with terrorism. “Bad luck,” as with Japanese immigrants in California at the outbreak of World War II, observes Jacob Bender, executive director of the Philadelphia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. For Muslims, 9/11 created “a level of suspicion that was heretofore unknown to their community.” Bender happens to be Jewish.

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