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Jacob Bender on WHYY Radio Times (audio)

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Jacob Bender was at WHYY studios on the Radio Times segment “Ballot Talks” to discuss President Obama’s Baltimore Mosque Visit with Marty Moss-Coane.

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“Thank you, Mr. Obama”

(Philadelphia, PA, 2/2/2016) – The Philadelphia Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-Philadelphia), the nation’s largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization, welcomes President Barack Obama’s visit today to the Islamic Society of Baltimore. This was Mr. Obama’s first visit to a mosque in the US since assuming the office of the Presidency.

CAIR-Philadelphia especially applauds the President’s statement that “we can’t be bystanders to bigotry.” These are powerful words in this political season of the worst attack on an American minority in many decades.

During his visit, the President met with community members and other Muslim leaders to discuss religious freedom, and he made clear that a major source of our nation’s strength is the fact that Americans of different faiths and backgrounds can and do thrive together in efforts to forge “a more perfect union.”

In relation to this history-making event, CAIR-Philadelphia’s Executive Director, Jacob Bender, stated:

“Of all the eloquent words spoken by Mr. Obama at the Islamic Society of Baltimore today, perhaps none were more important than his declaration that American Muslims have the right to criticize US and domestic policy without being labeled as disloyal by the media. This is especially true, we believe, when those American policies negatively impact Muslim lives, both here and abroad. We therefore note, not without much sadness, that no discussion about violent extremism in the Muslim world can be complete without considering the impact of the American wars (drones and torture included) in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the continued existence of the infamous prison camp at Guantanamo. Nonetheless, CAIR-Philadelphia hopes that Mr. Obama’s speech will send a strong message of inclusiveness and mutual understanding, much needed to help neutralize the anti-Muslim rhetoric now prevalently dominating the political discussion.”

CAIR-Philadelphia’s mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties of all people, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

Mr. Bender is available for TV, radio, and press interviews at any time.

— END —

CONTACT: CAIR-Philadelphia Executive Director Jacob Bender, 917.660.3805, jbender@cair.com

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Director’s Desk – Reflection on the Two Eids Campaign

January 29, 2016
by Jacob Bender

Sixty-two years ago, in the landmark case of Brown vs Board of Education, a unanimous Supreme Court of the United States ruled that state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. Separate educational facilities, the Court said, “were inherently unequal.” The ruling paved the road to integration and was considered a major victory for the civil rights movement.

One of the expert witnesses called to testify before the Court in this case was Dr. Kenneth Clarke, an African American educational psychologist, who presented evidence that showed how racial segregation in public schools had a deleterious and damaging impact on the psychological and educational development of African American students.

I was thinking about Brown vs Board of Education last week as I sat in the beautiful City Council Chambers in Philadelphia’s City Hall. CAIR-Philadelphia President Osama Al-Qasem and I were there to lend CAIR’s support to a resolution to make Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha official public school holidays.

The resolution was offered by Councilman Curtis Jones, the sole Muslim in the City Council. Jones movingly described growing up as an African American Muslim, and his feelings of inferiority and shame when Christmas was celebrated school- and city-wide, year after year. When Jones concluded his remarks, he was met by a thunderous applause from the more than 200 Muslim community members crammed into the City Council Chambers, and the Council voted to pass the Two Eids Resolution unanimously.

The resolution of January 21st was a great victory for freedom of religion and pluralism. However, it is not a law. The resolution still has to be approved by the city and teacher unions, and a host of other elected officials, including the Mayor.

The Philadelphia Eid Coalition (PEC), of which CAIR is a member, plans to continue to educate, advocate and encourage government officials to make the Eids legal holidays. PEC needs you to continue asking friends to sign our petition of support until we get 50,000 names. Additionally, The Coalition needs your continued financial contributions so we can continue to advocate for this cause.

Philadelphia has the highest percentage of Muslim residents of any major city in the U.S., numbering by some accounts over 200,000, with an estimated 15% of city public school students being Muslim. These statistics alone would warrant CAIR’s support for the Two Eids resolution, but there is more. The deeper significance of this campaign is that official recognition of the Two Eids would be a major victory along the road of full acceptance of Islam as one of the major religions of America. And so, one day in the near future, people would no longer speak of the United States as rooted in “Judeo-Christian” values, but as a multi-faith democracy built upon the shared Abrahamic values of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Each new legal victory by the Muslim community represents not “creeping Islamization” as the paranoid Muslim-haters warn, but “creeping pluralism,” and a growing interfaith movement of Christians, Jews, Sikhs, and other people of faith, standing in solidarity with the Muslim community against the forces of xenophobia and hatred.

The campaign for official recognition of the two Muslim holidays is being coordinated by the Philadelphia Eid Coalition. To learn more about the Coalition, and to support their work important work, visit phillyeid.org.

A new generation of Muslim American schoolchildren, and therefore the future of the Muslim community, depends upon you.

Salaam,


Jacob Bender
Executive Director        

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NOTICE: Symposium Postponed

Due to weather concerns, the Muslim Women in Sacred Spaces Symposium has been postponed to February 6 — details will be posted to our website and Facebook event page as they emerge.

Thank you.

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Director’s Desk, January 18, 2016 – Remembering Dr. King

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Riverside Church of NYC

by Jacob Bender

When I was 12 years old, my parents took me to hear Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speak at an outdoor rally for civil rights in the Watts section of Los Angeles. We were some of the very few white folks in the crowd. I can still remember the eloquent words pouring out of the man on the stage, the triumphant voice thundering for justice.

The day after hearing Dr. King speak, I was back in school, and I must have mentioned the event to my social studies teacher, because she asked me to give a report to the class. That afternoon, some boys followed me after school, yelling “n*gg*r lover” at me for a few blocks. Read more…

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